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We Work For Better Streets

Here is a current list of Trailnet’s Planning Projects. Read further details about these projects below.


Plan4Health

Project Overview

Through the American Planning Association’s Plan4Health program, Trailnet led an opportunity to work in partnership with the Missouri Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA Missouri) to address how-to design streets to be safer for people walking and biking. The project was funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

APA Missouri and Trailnet received both a Plan4Health and Planners4Health program grant to join 35 Plan4Health coalitions to increase access to physical activity and healthy food — and 28 Planners4Health projects to continue the momentum by integrating planning and public health in chapters across the country.

Project highlights were:

Project History

Through the American Planning Association’s Plan4Health program, Trailnet led an opportunity to work in partnership with the Missouri Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA Missouri) to address how-to design streets to be safer for people walking and biking. The project was funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 2015, APA Missouri received a $120,000 grant in working the Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) Partnership for community engagement activities using lighter, quicker, cheaper projects, also known as pop-up demonstrations. Engaging the community through pop-up demonstrations, the partnership is addressing walkability and highlighting ways to build better streets with traffic calming solutions. As part of the Plan4Health project, Trailnet and the HEAL Partnership created a variety of tools that can be used in temporary demonstrations for traffic calming. These tools will be used for pop-up demonstrations in the following focus areas: the Ville and Greater Ville, JeffVanderLou, Dutchtown, and Carondelet. The pop-up demonstrations offer possible solutions and provide fun and safe social spaces to St. Louis residents while also encouraging healthy, active living.

Trailnet and APA Missouri installed several pop-up traffic calming demonstrations in the city of St. Louis. The demonstrations utilized temporary structures like speed humps and roundabouts to slow car speeds. Slowing vehicle speeds and reducing cut-through traffic help make streets feel more friendly, livable, and welcoming to residents of all ages.

In 2017, APA Missouri and Trailnet received another grant of $60,000 to expand the initiative to educate planners and public health professionals across Missouri on the health impacts of street design. The project was an extension of Plan4Health through the American Planning Association’s Planners4Health program.

The Plan4Health project received positive reviews from community members, city staff, and elected officials within St. Louis, attracting national and international attention. As a result of the Plan4Health initiative, permanent crosswalk improvements were constructed in front of Woodward Elementary School, beautification projects sprouted in several neighborhoods, and an ordinance was passed in the City of St. Louis that will help to shape future traffic calming infrastructure projects.

Trailnet created the Slow Your Street: A How-To Guide for Pop-Up Traffic Calming, a manual that provides easy-to-follow instructions for creating additional demonstrations.

The Planners4Health project, in partnership with the Missouri Council of Activity and Nutrition, focused on sharing lessons learned from the traffic calming project throughout the state of Missouri. Communities gained  knowledge and resources that allowed integration of public health into local and regional planning practices.

Trailnet assisted APA Missouri in hosting four pop-up traffic calming demonstrations across the state, using the successes in St. Louis as a model. “The goal of the Planners4Health project is to share our insight across the state so APA Missouri members and public health professionals interested in promoting safer and healthier street designs have the resources to do so,” said Grace Kyung, special projects director at Trailnet.

“APA Missouri is excited for the opportunity to take the knowledge learned from the Plan4Health project in St. Louis and share it with our APA members across the state,” said Hilary Perkins, AICP, president of the Missouri Chapter of the American Planning Association. The Planners4Health initiative marks the three-year culmination of APA’s $9 million Plan4Health program that works to combat two determinants of chronic disease – lack of physical activity and lack of access to nutritious foods. Funding for the program is provided through a grant from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

For more information about the Plan4Health program, visit www.plan4health.us or follow the hashtag #Plan4Health on Twitter.


Traffic Calming

Traffic calming makes streets safer for people who walk and bike by reducing the speed at which cars travel. Slowing car traffic and reducing cut-through traffic helps make streets feel more friendly, livable, and welcoming to residents of all ages. As defined by the Institute of Transportation Engineers, “Traffic calming involves changes in street alignment, installation of barriers, and other physical measures to reduce traffic speeds and/or cut-through volumes, in the interest of street safety, livability, and other public purposes.”

Project for Public Spaces created helpful tips and information to know, such as a traffic calming toolbox. Check out their Traffic Calming 101 toolbox for more information.

Examples of successful traffic calming:

Traffic Calming Lending Library

Traffic calming makes streets safer for people who walk and bike by reducing the speed at which cars travel. We built a toolkit to make it easy for everyone to create their own pop-up traffic calming demonstrations and show how streets can be designed for those who walk and bike.

Trailnet has materials available for individuals to use for traffic calming demonstrations. A list of available resources can be found within the Slow Your Street guide. If you are interested in checking-out the materials then please contact planning@trailnet.org.


Current Pedestrian and Bicycle Plans

Florissant

Trailnet and the City of Florissant have begun working continue to work together to develop a Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. When finished, the plan will provide a blueprint for the development of pedestrian and bicycle improvements throughout the community, making it safer and easier to reach local destinations, including parks, schools, transit, and commercial areas.

The planning team continues to  currently  seek residents’ input regarding walking and biking activities and their desires for future pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Using the input initially gathered through October of 2017,  a draft plan is being developed. Once initial input is collected a draft plan will be developed and additional public input sought. The plan is expected to be finalized at the end of 2017. 

Your input is important to our planning process! Please take a few minutes to answer this short survey regarding pedestrian and bicycle improvements within Florissant.


Calm Streets

A Calm Street is a residential street transformed to reduce speeding and provide safety for everyone traveling there. Using traffic calming features such as speed humps and curb extensions, Calm Streets create an environment where people drive the speed limit and therefore preserve the safety of people walking and biking.

In 2014 Trailnet and partners educated more than 1,200 residents about Calm Streets through community meetings, walks, and outreach. From 2015 – 2016, Trailnet and partners worked through a strategic work plan for building Calm Streets, beginning with selecting pilot routes. In the fall of 2017 funding for the first pilot on Louisiana Ave. was awarded by East West Gateway Council of Governments through the Transportation Alternatives Program to the City of St. Louis. 

The pilot is a one mile section of Louisiana Ave. between Cherokee Street (north) and Meramec Street (south) to reduce speeding and improve safety. When these traffic calming elements were tested as a pop-up next to Marquette park in November 2016 people driving slowed down by over 10 miles per hour. Ten miles per hour is the difference for someone struck by a car having a 5% chance of dying (with the concept installed) or having a 45% chance of dying (current street layout).

The Louisiana Pilot will go for design in 2018, with construction expected to begin in 2019. Trailnet continues to work with the City of St. Louis to engage and plan for future Calm Streets across the city of St. Louis.

Support this project by donating to Trailnet. Stay tuned for more ways to get involved in 2018.


Please contact planning@trailnet.org for further questions or information in regards to our Current Planning Projects.