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Tucker Bike-Walk-Bus project moves towards construction, receives $1.1 M grant

artist rendering of tucker protected bike lane project

A .9 mile cycle track is coming to downtown St. Louis. Today, the Tucker Bike-Walk-Bus improvement project received a $1.1M federal construction grant clearing the way for construction.

The project is sponsored by the City of St. Louis and was developed by Trailnet along with community partners. It includes a .9 mile cycle track (protected bike lane), bus stop upgrades, and crosswalk improvements.

The improvements along Tucker Blvd. stretch between Chouteau Ave. and Washington Ave., crossing the Mill Creek railyard and connecting into downtown. This North-South route creates a more-accessible, less-stressful, and safer connection into downtown.

The two-way cycle track and numerous intersection safety improvements along the corridor will create a safer connection for people walking, biking, and taking the bus. These improvements include bus islands, pedestrian refuge islands, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, crosswalk signal upgrades, and high-visibility crosswalks along this .9 mile stretch of Tucker Blvd.

map of tucker project showing connections to other greenways and bikeroutes, includes bus stop locations

Tucker Blvd. was identified for improvement based on public input in Trailnet’s Connecting St. Louis plan, the Downtown St. Louis Transportation Plan, and the Design Downtown STL plan. This project represents a key step to better connection and a implementation of these planning and community engagement efforts. 

These plans prioritized Tucker Blvd. as a safe, low-stress connection over the rail yard downtown. The rail yard is major barrier for people on bike and on foot in the region. Tucker was selected over other route options based on resident input, the width of the bridge, connection to public resources, access to public housing, the lack of interstate ramps, among other factors.

This construction project is one of several moving forward in St. Louis City that that prioritize people walking and biking.

These projects include:
– The Tower Grove Connector – another partnership between Trailnet and the City
– Replacing the Compton St. bridge to include a cycle track
– A cycle track along 20th St. and 22nd St. aligning with Project Connect linking north city and the central corridor
– Great Rivers Greenway’s Brickline Greenway Project

GRANT DETAILS
The federal funding for this project comes from the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) by the US Department of Transportation. TAP funds are competitive grants aimed at supporting smaller bike, pedestrian, and other community-based projects. The funding was awarded by the East-West Gateway Council of Governments (EWG). EWG is responsible for transportation funding, in an eight county area in Missouri and Illinois.

WHAT’S A CYCLE TRACK?
A cycle track is a protected bike lane that physically separates bike traffic from car traffic and people walking.
Cycle tracks can come in different variations (one-way vs. two-way) and can use different methods of separating bikes from sidewalks and the street (curbs, raised lanes, planters, etc.)
Cycle tracks provide important separated space for people of all ages and abilities to bike.

This project will feature a two-way cycle track on the west side of Tucker Blvd., with curbs separating bike traffic from car traffic and the sidewalk. Detailed plans are available here.

NEXT STEPS
This project will now move forward, with construction planned for 2023.

This progress is thanks to the generous support of partners including the City of St. Louis, The Downtown St. Louis Community Improvement District, People for Bikes, Alderman Jack Coatar, a number of family foundations, area businesses, as well as Trailnet members and supporters like you.

We’re Hiring: Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Trailnet is looking for a communications professional to advance our work of making walking and biking a way of life in the St. Louis region. The Marketing and Communications Coordinator will guide our communications and marketing strategy to tell our story of success in achieving our mission, while maintaining and strengthening the Trailnet message and brand.

Trailnet has a wide audience of 2,000 members and more than 19,000 constituents that follow and support our work. This position is highly collaborative, leading online, social media, print, PR, multimedia, and brand management initiatives in a fast-paced environment.

The Marketing and Communications Coordinator reports directly to the Policy Manager, works closely with the leadership team, and coordinates communications with the program areas of rides, planning, and advocacy.

About the Organization
Trailnet is a nonprofit 501 (c) (3) organization with a 33-year history making walking and biking a way of life in the St. Louis region. Trailnet achieves its mission through a variety of programs that get people moving and help the region build for better walking and biking

Responsibilities
– Work with staff to manage Trailnet’s brand, messaging, and voice
– Oversee the development and release of all content for every department
– Create and deliver marketing and communications plans for various initiatives, events, and programs
– Consult with staff to create promotions and marketing materials/media for projects, programs, and events
– Lead the creation of web content across all social media platforms, website, and calendar events; monitor and maintain up-to-date and correct content on all platforms
– Produce and manage email communications, including a regular newsletter, and project-specific communications
– Carry out and track marketing fulfillment on all sponsorship agreements /contracts with the support of the Development Director, Rides Manager, and other staff
– Work with staff to strategize, schedule, and manage Trailnet’s social media
– Coordinate the production of Trailnet’s print and electronic collateral: fundraising materials, postcards, flyers, press packets, etc.
– Create public notices, social media and radio advertisements
– Organize and manage marketing materials and media; on-call monitoring of social media; track and document all media hits
– Provide copy editing and proofreading as needed
– Work tabling events as needed

Qualifications
– Bachelor’s degree or demonstrated commensurate experience
– 1 to 2 years of relevant experience preferred
– Must be highly computer literate with the ability to effectively use technology and social media marketing strategies

Requirements
– Creative writing/marketing skills
– Strong copy editing skills
– Strong written and verbal communications skills
– Proficiency in Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office, G-suite, and WordPress
– Organizational skills in scheduling and monitoring social media and contracted marketing activities and agreements
– Strong problem-solving skills
– Strong organizational and time management skills
– Self-motivated—able to work alone and as a member of a team
– Demonstrated ability to work in fast-paced environment with a strong sense of prioritization
– Able to interact with a diverse community of staff, partners, participants, and volunteers
– Willingness to work some evenings and weekends throughout the year
– Graphic Design skills and visual / artistic skills are a plus
– Mailchimp or email CRM experience is a plus
– Proficiency in photography and videography is a plus

Compensation
The position is full time (40hrs/ week with reduced work week available at 30 hrs) with a competitive benefit package including medical and dental insurance, salary is commensurate with experience, flexible hours, casual work environment, office located in downtown St. Louis, a short walk from MetroLink. A company car is available for some business-related local and regional travel. Free membership to the Downtown Bike Station. Salary range is $31,200- $34,093.

Commitment to Equity and Equal Opportunity
Trailnet is committed to support diversity and equal opportunity in its services, administration, and employment, as well as research and activities. We strive to foster a working environment that values contributions from team members including those based on race, color, creed, gender, faith background, culture, sexual orientation, sexual identity, mental disabilities, physical disabilities, or veteran status. We work with a wide range of external partners and stakeholders, and we seek candidates that are committed to their own cultural competency. Women, people of color, people with disabilities, and members of the LGBTQ community are encouraged to apply.

Work Conditions:
Office Environment with work from home as the standard during the COVID-19 pandemic Dependable high-speed internet is required for frequent video calls via Zoom and Google

The Marketing and Communications Coordinator should have a presence at 15-20 outdoor events in the bistate region, including bike rides and community rides throughout Spring, Summer, and Fall. Barring COVID-19 restrictions on event schedule.

Fundraising and outreach events take place at a variety of indoor and outdoor locations.

Physical Responsibilities:
Transport up to 25 lbs. of tabling or outreach materials to events
Work at a computer
Staff tables at outreach events

Application Information
Applicants should send a cover letter and resume to hr@trailnet.org.

Kelly Remick: Our new director of development

Trailnet is excited to announce our new Director of Development. Kelly Remick joined our team to manage and grow our fundraising and development efforts. Kelly brings years of fundraising and relationship-building experience to the team, previously serving as a Community Relationship Manager for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. In that role she supported and managed community-led and event-based fundraising efforts across a four state region, including Missouri.

“I’m excited to make an impact in the St. Louis community. I’m really looking forward to getting to know the Trailnet family, so please don’t hesitate to reach out and introduce yourself!” – Kelly

Kelly fills a vacancy left by Marica Quint who left staff last year.

Kelly moved to St. Louis in 2019. She’s originally from Woodstock, Ill., a town best known as the filming location of Groundhog Day starring Bill Murray. Kelly is a graduate of the University of Illinois and is completing a Masters of Nonprofit Management at Washington University. Outside of work, Kelly enjoys reading, puzzles, wine, hiking, and biking. She’s recently ventured into gardening and looks for any opportunity to get outside and enjoy the weather.

Weigh in: Tucker Blvd. Bike-Walk-Bus public comments

artist rendering of tucker protected bike lane project

Updated Jan. 29, 2021

Public Comments are open for a .9 mile cycle track construction project on Tucker Blvd. downtown.

You can add your support or input for this project. This is a competitive grant, so the more people who add their support the more likely it is to get funding.

LEAVE A COMMENT (two options)

OPTION 1
Click here, scroll down, select “ST LOUIS,” then click on “TUCKER BOULEVARD CYCLE TRACK” and follow the instructions.

OR

OPTION 2
Send an email to TIP@ewgateway.org and

Paste “Comment on TIP 207165-22 TUCKER BOULEVARD CYCLE TRACK” into the subject line. Then leave you comment making sure to state where you live, if you use the corridor and if you support the project.

PROJECT DETAILS
This month, the East-West Gateway Council of Governments (EWG) advanced a $1.1 million federal construction application for biking, walking, and bus stop improvements on Tucker Blvd. between Chouteau Ave. and Washington Ave. The public comment period for this project is from Jan. 29 through Feb. 26.

The project is sponsored by the City of St. Louis and was developed by Trailnet and community partners. This key route is one step closer to seeing a protected bike lane and other improvements recommended by Trailnet’s Connecting St. Louis Plan

Tucker was identified during the 2016-2018 Connecting St. Louis community engagement and planning effort as a potential safe low-stress connection over the rail yard downtown. This rail yard is major barrier for people on bike and on foot in the region. It has been identified in numerous studies including the Downtown Multi-Modal Plan and Connecting St. Louis. Tucker was selected over other options based on resident input, the width of the bridge, the lack of interstate ramps, and other factors.

The proposed two-way, cycle track and numerous intersection safety improvements along the corridor will create a safer connection for people walking, biking, and taking the bus. These include bus islands, pedestrian refuge islands, crosswalk signal upgrades, and high-visibility crosswalks along this .9 mile stretch of Tucker.

WHAT’S A CYCLE TRACK?
A cycle track is a protected bike lane that physically separates bike traffic from car traffic and people walking.
Cycle tracks can come in different variations (one-way vs. two-way) and can use different methods of separating bikes from sidewalks and the street (curbs, raised lanes, planters, etc.)
Cycle tracks provide important separated space for people of all ages and abilities to bike.

map of tucker project showing connections to other greenways and bikeroutes, includes bus stop locations

Trailnet in partnership with others funded a preliminary engineering study — completed in March 2020 — to bring this project closer to construction.

The City submitted an application for funding through the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) under the US Department of Transportation. This is a competitive grant aimed at supporting smaller bike, pedestrian and other community-based projects. The next step will be a vote from EWG’s board to approve this recommendation.

This progress is thanks to the generous support of members and supporters like you, partners including The City of St. Louis, Downtown STL, People for Bikes, Alderman Jack Coatar, a number of family foundations, and area businesses who are making this effort possible.

2020 City of St. Louis Crash Report

As we move into a new year, it’s vital to take a look back at the real impact of traffic violence in St. Louis City. This 2020 crash report, created by Trailnet, highlights areas of major concern for the safety of people walking and biking.

Overall 5,672 people were injured or killed in crashes in the city last year. Of those, 19 people were killed and 205 were injured while walking, and 51 people were injured while biking.

These crashes are not evenly distributed. Traffic violence follows many of the ongoing patterns of systemic racism and segregation with 74% of pedestrian deaths and 64% of fatal car crashes occurring on the north side. In St. Louis it is more dangerous to walk or drive in predominantly Black neighborhoods.

The speed and type of road plays a major role in these crashes. More than one-third all crashes affecting people on foot took place on only six streets, all of which have posted speeds above 30mph.

Along with examining the problem of traffic violence, the report lays out solutions. These solutions, when used by elected officials and governmental leaders, have the potential to save lives. Click the image to the right to see the full document.

Click to access the report.

Trailnet’s Policy Principles

During the first meeting of 2021, Trailnet’s board of directors approved seven principles to guide the organization’s advocacy and policy work. These policy principles were developed based on Trailnet’s Mission and Values, as well as the past policy work of the organization.

The purpose of the principles are to: 1) frame and communicate the organization’s motivating beliefs on legislation and regulations, as well as2) lay out criteria to ensure consistent advocacy within the scope of our mission.

Policy Principles

Trailnet’s guiding principles and priorities for city, county and state policy are to:

  • Improve safety for people using core transportation: biking, walking, and public transit
  • Prioritize financially sustainable funding that supports core transportation
  • Advance racially-equitable transportation practices and increase equitable access to core transportation
  • Reduce transportation’s negative contribution to personal health outcomes, local environmental impacts and global climate change
  • Increase public and neighborhood-level engagement in transportation projects and policy decisions
  • Support fair enforcement of traffic laws that protect vulnerable road users
  • Support affordable, sustainable, and maintainable transportation-focused housing and economic development

NOTE: We use the term “walking” to encompass anyone who is primarily using the sidewalk to get around. By this, we mean people: on foot, in manual wheelchairs, in powerchairs, and using other mobility aids.

Principles and Explanations


Improve safety for people using core transportation: biking, walking, and public transit

Biking, walking, and public transit are at the heart of our history, mission, and vision as an organization. Advocating for and promoting safety of these core transportation modes are a key to a healthy, sustainable, and equitable future of the St. Louis community. When we say “walking” we also mean people who use wheelchairs or other mobility devices.

Prioritize financially sustainable funding that supports core transportation

We support an overall increase in funding toward core transportation infrastructure but that funding needs to be geared towards realistic long-term considerations of maintenance and predicted use. Core transportation is already significantly underfunded compared to car-focused projects and we do not support overall increases in transportation funding that perpetuates this status quo.

Advance racially-equitable transportation practices and increase equitable access to core transportation

We are committed to advancing racial equity and are focused on improving the mobility of Black, indigenous, and other people of color. Racially-equitable transportation practices must be present in all levels and phases.
We believe that core transportation infrastructure should be fairly designed and built to address the needs of underserved communities; whether that is based on race, disability, gender, income level, or other factors. Transportation policies should counteract existing inequities and prioritize justice.

Reduce transportation’s negative contributions to personal health outcomes, local environmental impacts and global climate change

Car-centered transportation contributes to less-healthy lifestyles, reduces local air quality, and is a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Shifting to a low-carbon transportation system built around walking, biking, and public transit fights climate change, improves the local environment, and supports healthy, active lifestyles.

Increase public and neighborhood-level engagement in transportation projects and policy decisions

We believe that communities, neighborhoods, and the people who inhabit them possess the knowledge, experience, and capacity for decision making. As residents they are the experts on their communities, and they stand to benefit or lose the most from project decisions. We believe decision makers should listen to and elevate the voices of individuals in these communities, and we do not support projects that bypass community input.

Support fair enforcement of traffic laws that protect vulnerable road users

We support the review of traffic laws related to safety for people walking and biking. Fair enforcement should reduce traffic law infractions and specifically address behaviors that put vulnerable road users including but not limited to the disabled, elderly, children, people walking, and people biking at risk of injury or death.

Support affordable, equitable, sustainable, and maintainable transportation- focused housing and economic development

Transportation policy does not exist in a vacuum. In order to support mobility and enable a shift to core-transportation we support economic development and housing policies that promote the density, equity, and sustainability that makes core transportation most effective. We believe projects should account for maintenance cost and avoid disruption to existing communities.

Tucker Blvd. Bike-Walk-Bus Construction Update

artist rendering of tucker protected bike lane project

Updated Jan. 8, 2021

This week, the East-West Gateway Council of Governments (EWG) advanced a $1.1 million federal construction application for biking, walking, and bus stop improvements on Tucker Blvd. between Chouteau Ave. and Washington Ave.

The project is sponsored by the City of St. Louis and was developed by Trailnet and community partners. This key route is one step closer to seeing a protected bike lane and other improvements recommended by Trailnet’s Connecting St. Louis Plan

On Wednesday, the EWG staff recommended this project for funding, an important step in advance of a final vote from the EWG board.

The rail lines south of downtown are a major barrier for people on bike and on foot in the region. They have been identified in numerous studies including the Downtown Multi-Modal Plan and Connecting St. Louis. 

The proposed two-way, curb-protected bike lane and numerous intersection safety improvements along the corridor will create a safer connection for people walking, biking, and taking the bus. These include bus islands, pedestrian refuge islands, crosswalk signal upgrades, and high-visibility crosswalks along this .9 mile stretch of Tucker.

map of tucker project showing connections to other greenways and bikeroutes, includes bus stop locations

Trailnet in partnership with others funded a preliminary engineering study — completed in March 2020 — to bring this project closer to construction.

The City submitted an application for funding through the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) under the US Department of Transportation. This is a competitive grant aimed at supporting smaller bike, pedestrian and other community-based projects. The next step will be a vote from EWG’s board to approve this recommendation.

This progress is thanks to the generous support of members and supporters like you, partners including The City of St. Louis, Downtown STL, People for Bikes, Alderman Jack Coatar, a number of family foundations, and area businesses who are making this effort possible.

Trailnet’s Holiday Gift Guide

Looking for a last minute gift this holiday season? Maybe you want to make a donation to a non-profit/organization instead of buying a physical gift? Check out this holiday gift guide put together by the Trailnet staff!

Below are a few great non-profits/organizations that our staff are highlighting this holiday season and a physical gift for anyone who loves walking, biking, or anything transportation related.

Suggestion From Taylor March – Director of Policy

  • Front Basket – “This basket from Wald is a practical size, is sturdy and includes supports that connect to the handlebars and down at the front axle, is almost universally compatible with bikes, is made in the United States in Maysville, KY, and can be easily upgraded with some nice bags if you desire. You’d be hard pressed to find a cheaper and better upgrade to your experience and ability to carry the things you need on your way. 
  • Price: $25.75 
  • Support Action St. Louis – Action St. Louis is a grassroots racial justice organization that seeks to build political power for Black communities in the St. Louis region. Action St. Louis builds campaigns that leverages organizing, communications, advocacy and direct action to mitigate harm against our community while fighting for long term transformation.

Suggestions from Matt Hartman – Rides Manager

  • Surly Neck Gaiter – “A Neck Gaiter is a versatile piece of clothing … Wear it around your neck to keep the warm air in and the cold air out. Pull it up over your face when there is a biting wind. The options are limited only by your imagination, plus it’s wool so you know it’s going to do the trick keeping you warm … One size fits most necks.
  • Price: $40
  • Support The Missouri Interscholastic Cycling League – Their mission is to facilitate the development of high school and middle school teams/clubs for grades 6-12 and provide the education, training, licensing, and insurance for coaches and volunteers. They also produce high-quality mountain bike events and races that emphasize the value of participation, camaraderie, positive sporting behavior, and well-being over competition.

Suggestions from Sam McCrory – Programs Coordinator

  • Support GirlTrek – Pioneer a health movement for African-American women and girls grounded in civil rights history and principles through walking campaigns, community leadership, and health advocacy.
  • Happy City – Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design – Award-winning journalist Charles Montgomery finds answers to such questions at the intersection between urban design and the emerging science of happiness, during an exhilarating journey through some of the world’s most dynamic cities. 
  • Price: $18 (At Left Bank and Subterranean Book)

Suggestion from Kevin Hahn – Strategic Policy and Communications Specialist

  • Support The Center for Hearing and Speech – The Center is working to create a world where there is access to communication services for all. The Center for Hearing & Speech provides professional, friendly, and affordable services to more than 40,000 individuals annually.
  • Merino 150 Beanie – “The Merino 150 Beanie is a lightweight, year-round essential. Run in it, skate ski in it, put it under a helmet for a chilly morning bike commute. Clean seams for a no-bulk fit. More durable now than ever with new Merino 150 fabric”.
  • Price: $25

Suggestions from Gaby Berberich – Membership Manager

  • Bike Chain Coffee Mug – Perfect java vessel for cyclists, garage nuts, and industrial aficionados. Ceramic, 14-oz mug, only for hand wash, not for microwave use.
  • Price: $18.84
  • Support Great Rivers Environmental Law Center – Great Rivers Environmental Law Center is a nonprofit public interest environmental organization working to: promote the public health by encouraging cleaner energy, improved environmental performance by businesses, and more efficient transportation and land use, thereby achieving cleaner air and water, and improving the quality of life in the region preserve open spaces, forests, floodplains and wetlands for their recreational, aesthetic, and agricultural benefits, and their values as flood storage and habitat for migratory birds and other species; protect disadvantaged populations from an unreasonable share of the environmental burdens of modern society and aid and advise citizens and organizations in asserting and defending their interests in environmental values before administrative officials, and, as a last resort, before the courts.

Suggestion from Kevin Keach – Project and Facilities Administrator

  • Support St. Louis BWorks – St. Louis BWorks inspires youth to pursue their dreams, care for the world around them, and explore new possibilities through experiential learning.
  • Sign Up for Bike Index – A bike registration services used across the country by individuals, bike shops, and police departments that gives everyone the ability to register and recover bicycles.

Suggestions from Joe Windler – Mobility Coordinator

  • Crash Course: If You Want To Get Away With Murder Buy a Car – Using the comic book format, this book vehemently dispels the notion that traffic accidents are inevitable and/or acceptable on any level, insisting that drivers own their responsibility, and consider the consequences of careless and dangerous behavior. It is part thought experiment, part testimonial, and part indictment of a dysfunctional transit environment that puts convenience for drivers ahead of logic, natural resources, and even ahead of human life. Crash Course questions the decisions that shape all our lives. Why don’t roads serve everyone who needs to use them? What makes some people not worth protecting? Where do we start in fixing a broken system that facilitates the use of vehicles as murder weapons in places like Charlottesville, VA?
  • Price: $17 (from Left Bank and Subterranean Books)
  • Support City Greens Market – At City Greens Market, our mission is to: Provide access to fresh, quality, and affordable food to our neighbors, promote healthy living in our community, provide a safe and comfortable space for our neighbors to interact, support local farmers as part of our extended communit

St. Louis County Council Approves Bike Reforms

St. Louis County unanimously approved a new package of bike-friendly traffic rules that prioritize the safety of people on bikes, and other vulnerable road users.

The ordinance prioritizes people’s safety and judgement when using lanes, creates a 3-foot passing rule, spells out when people are allowed to ride side by side, creates protections for vulnerable road users, and updates rules for e-bikes.

Monday night, the St. Louis County Council approved County Bill 385, introduced by Councilwoman Kelli Dunaway, which updates the county’s rules on how people on bikes can use roads in unincorporated St. Louis County.

Our streets belong to everyone and everyone should be free to safely use them. We are confident that these policies are an important step towards safer streets.

Trailnet and other advocates worked with Dunaway and the county council to include the needs and concerns of the community. These reforms are an important step to improving safety. Future work will need to ensure similar reforms are adopted by municipalities in the county, as well as St. Louis City and the surrounding region.

These changes highlight Trailnet’s stance that a road-design changes and infrastructure improvements are still necessary to improve safety throughout the region.

The new ordinance updates the county traffic code by:

Prioritizing people’s safety and judgement

Previously, the county has a one-size-fits-none approach, requiring bike traffic to stay as far to the right as “practicable” with no exemptions. If taken by the letter of the law, this means, riding in the gutter, in the door zone or on the shoulder. People riding bikes any other way could be cited for violating traffic law.

The new rules give people on bikes more flexibility under the law to use their judgment. It lays out different exceptions that more closely matches how people actually interact safely on the road.

The reforms create a default for people on bikes to ride in the same direction as traffic and to stay to the right side of the right-most lane. However, it prioritizes people’s safety and judgement when laying out conditions where people can use the full lane, shoulder, or change lanes to:

  • Avoid debris or other hazards
  • Avoid vehicles turning in right-turn only lanes
  • If the road is too narrow for bikes and cars to share the same lane
  • Preparing to make left turns
  • Avoid other unsafe conditions
  • If people follow these rules and obey other traffic laws, they would not violate rules against impeding traffic.

3-foot Passing

It also adds a 3-foot passing law for people in cars when overtaking people on bikes. It requires people driving to:

  1. Change lanes to pass, if there is a passing lane.
  2. If there is no passing lane, people driving must still give the person on the bike 3 feet of space while passing.
  3. It allows people driving to safely cross over the middle lane, even in no-passing zones, in order to give 3 feet to the person in the bike.

Riding Abreast

The legislation would also update the law to allow people on bikes to ride side by side on the street, which was prohibited under the old ordinance.
People may ride abreast if:

  1. They don’t significantly impede other traffic
  2. They are riding on the shoulder, bike lane, or bike path

People riding side by side must switch to riding singe file when they encounter other vehicles.

Vulnerable Road Users

The new rules also define Vulnerable Road Users including:

  • People walking
  • People using wheelchairs
  • People riding bikes and using scooters, skateboards, roller skates, etc.
  • People working on the roadway: construction workers, first responders
  • People walking pets
  • People in animal-drawn vehicles
  • People on mopeds or motorcycles
  • People driving farm equipment

The ordinance prohibits people driving in a “careless or distracted manner” if it causes injury to a vulnerable road user. This creates a penalty for distracted driving if it causes a crash, hurting a vulnerable road user.

This falls short of an overall distracted driving ban, since Missouri state law currently prevents local governments from passing their own distracted driving traffic rules. This reality prevents counties and cities from exercising local control, blocking them from addressing this dangerous behavior.

E-Bikes

This bill also extends rules governing bikes to include e-bikes and motorized bikes. The ordinance adopts the three class E-Bike system being used in 22 other states.

Moving forward

These reforms to traffic laws show an important level of political will in the County to support safety for vulnerable road usurers and people on bikes. The soon to be completed St. Louis County Action Plan for Walking and Biking is another important step to prioritize infrastructure to prioritize safety as well.

This success is important and Trailnet is committed to pursue bike-friendly policy and infrastructure in individual municipalities across the region.

Everyday Connections: Neighborhood-focused improvements

Beginning in the Spring of 2020, Trailnet began working with three St. Louis communities to improve walking and biking infrastructure and policies. Trailnet partnered with the Jeff-Vander-Lou and Ville/Greater Ville neighborhoods in the City of St. Louis and the City of Clayton to improve bicycle and pedestrian safety through improved infrastructure and policy.

Trailnet has been working with residents and community partners to plan and improve upon existing conditions within each community/neighborhood. This work was funded with assistance from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). Read more about what Trailnet is doing to improve connections to everyday destinations in each community.

Jeff-Vander-Lou Neighborhood

Expanding upon the work done in 2015 as a part of a Plan4Health traffic calming grant, Trailnet has been working in the Jeff-Vander-Lou (JVL) neighborhood by planning for traffic calming improvements to curb dangerous driving habits which affect safety for people walking and biking. Trailnet staff has been working with JVL community organizations and residents to 1) identify areas that are in need of traffic calming improvements and 2) brainstorm solutions that will help slow down traffic and enhance pedestrian safety. Trailnet staff met with numerous JVL residents, the neighborhood association, and a JVL alderperson to discuss solutions, timeline, and funding opportunities to make significant improvements within the neighborhood.

In preparation to work with JVL residents and organizations, Trailnet staff also created a traffic calming guide that mentions characteristics, implementation costs, and 3-D renderings of numerous traffic calming solutions that have been used across the City of St. Louis. While the guide was created to help JVL residents visualize and understand the different types of traffic calming used throughout the City, the guide will also be available to residents and organizations in other St. Louis City neighborhoods who are interested in traffic calming solutions in their neighborhood.

Ville/Greater Ville Neighborhood

In the Ville/Greater Ville neighborhood, Trailnet is working with 4theVille to help develop the engagement around a neighborhood plan for walking, biking, and transit improvements. In addition to the strategy to get residents involved in the future neighborhood plan, including a phone survey of people’s current challenges with getting to their everyday destinations.

Trailnet is also providing the neighborhood with existing conditions maps and analysis. Trailnet is looking at several factors that impact walking and biking safety, these include: speed limit, street width, average annual daily traffic, bicycle and pedestrian crashes (and their characteristics), crime that would impact how safe someone feels walking, MetroBus service and associated stops, and vacancy. Trailnet is mapping these factors to help analyze if there are any trends that impact walking and biking safety in the neighborhood that could be addressed by infrastructure or policy recommendations.

City of Clayton

The City of Clayton has committed their DHSS funding to improving pedestrian signage around Shaw Park in Downtown Clayton. The addition of the pedestrian signage will enhance pedestrian crossing safety in and out of Shaw Park.

Trailnet has also been working with the City of Clayton to improve their Complete Street Ordinance. Adopted in 2012, the Complete Streets Ordinance encourages walking, biking, and other non-motorized forms of transit, in addition to typical motorized transit for all users regardless of age or ability.

The Ordinance sets out an ultimate goal to create streets that balance the needs of all users in order to achieve maximum functionality and use.

Now Trailnet and the City of Clayton are looking to improve several facets of the Complete Streets Ordinance including standards on equity, design standards, performance measures, project exceptions, and project selection criteria.